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Sophomore sees success on eSports team

19 March 2020

Pratt Community College Sophomore, Luke Hurt, has been with the eSports team for the past two years. In that time, Hurt, has seen his team accomplish an undefeated season through hours of practice, dedication and comradery.
                  
eSports is a form of competitive sports played online against people around the world. Multiple games such as League of Legends and Hearthstone are played, allowing all types of people to compete. PCC’s eSports team launched Fall 2017 and are currently competitive members of the Collegiate StarLeague (CSL).
 
Hurt is from Fall River, Kan. He heard about the eSports program when a PCC recruiter came to his high school.
 
“The recruiter heard that I had an interest in computers,” said Hurt. “He asked if I would be interested in joining the eSports team.”
 
Hurt has grown up playing video games, but it wasn’t until college that he began playing video games competitively.
 
“As a sport, I like how flexible eSports is and that anyone can do it,” said Hurt. “It’s more of a team required game and requires strategy. Anyone can play but it takes practice.”
 
In addition to dedicated practice time, the eSports team watches game film of their competition. This helps them learn how the opposing team plays and what type of strategy their opponents have. They also watch professional team’s game film to pick up tips and strategies. eSports teams are very competitive and PCC eSports is no different.
 
Beaver eSports relies on each team member to follow their respective role. Everyone has to do their part, or the entire dynamic will fall down. This partly falls back on their overall team strategy and the role of each character while competing.
 
“You don’t have to be a gaming master to be a part of the eSports program,” said Hurt. “With the required practice time and dedication to improve, you will see progress and playing time. You get out of it what you put into it. If you put enough time into the game you can master it.”
 
The PCC eSports program finished the regular season undefeated in the Central 2 division. The Central 2 division consists of schools in Kansas, Oklahoma, Nebraska and Colorado. Throughout their season, PCC completed against mostly universities and tech schools. 
 
“This season has definitely been a good season, we are undefeated going into the playoffs,” said Hurt.
 
One of Hurt’s favorite aspects of eSports is before the game when the players are discussing strategy and joking around. Hurt also enjoys seeing all aspects of the game pan out during the competitions. On the eSports team they have main-liners and subs. The main-liners are the players that have a higher skill level and are the first to be called on for a competition. The subs have a slightly lower skill level and will step in to compete if one of the main-liners is unable to compete.
 
Anyone with a gaming background can be a part of the eSports team. In addition to meeting peers that have similar interests and hobbies, there is also a scholarship opportunity through eSports. Many of PCC’s eSports players agreed that their eSports scholarship has made an impact in their lives.
 
“One of the only reasons I’m able to afford college is because of the eSports scholarship,” said Hurt.
 
For more information about the PCC eSports team, scholarships and what it takes to participate on the collegiate team contact eSports Head Coach Chris Nelson at chrisn@prattcc.edu.